a writer based in Tokyo
Georges Adéagbo
Georges Adéagbo, 1995

I recently found my photographs of Georges Adéagbo’s London show from 1995. Strange detail jumps out as I look at these again: an interview with writer Kenzaburo Oe being one (we share a birthday; exactly twice my age), and political scientist Suzanne Berger on “Anti-statism” being the other.

“This exhibition brought together six contemporary artists, from several African countries, who make compelling objects and images encompassing a diversity of cultural references, from Mali to the Northern Transvaal. The artists used a range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and installation. Works included Frédéric Bruly Bouabré’s piece of over 200 small-scale coloured drawings from the on-going series Conaissance du Monde, which incorporated Alphabet Beté (first version) never previously exhibited; and Cyprien Tokoudagba’s work completed directly on the walls of the Serpentine Gallery, which explored the imagery he painted in the temples of Benin.”

http://www.serpentinegalleries.org/whats-on/big-city-artists-africa/
Georges Adéagbo, 1995

“The Serpentine is proud to present Big City: Artists from Africa as part of africa 95. The exhibition brings together six contemporary artists, who make compelling objects and images encompassing a diversity of cultural references, from Mali to the Northern Transvaal. The artists use a range of media; painting, sculpture, photography and installation. Georges Adéagbo has travelled to England to create an installation comprising elements transported from Benin in conjunction with objects he has found in LondonFrédéric Bruly Bouabré is represented by over 200 small-scale coloured drawings from the ongoing series Conaissance du Monde, incorporating Alphabet Bété (first version) which has never been exhibited. Bodys Isek Kingelez’s architectural models embody his utopian vision of future urban environments. Seydou Keïta’s evocative black and white photographs from the 1950s and ‘60s vividly record the life of the community in which he lived. Johannes Mashego Segogela’s wooden tableaux warn us of the repercussions of violence and social injustice. Cyprien Tokoudagba has travelled to London to make a work directly on to the walls of the Serpentine Gallery, exploring the imagery he paints in the temples of Benin.”

From the preface to the Big City: Artists from Africa catalogue
Georges Adéagbo, 1995
Georges Adéagbo, 1995
Georges Adéagbo, 1995
Georges Adéagbo, 1995
Georges Adéagbo, 1995
Georges Adéagbo, 1995

Big City: Artists from Africa
Serpentine Gallery, London
21 Sept — 5 Nov 1995

Curators: Julia Peyton-Jones & André Magnin